Dance Team Gr. 5-8

Drama K-Gr. 3

Performing Acting Gr. 4-8

Rock Band Gr. 1-3

Beginning Keyboard K-Gr. 3

Keyboard 2 Gr. 4-8

Ukulele K-Gr. 4

Drums & Percussion K-Gr. 3

Drum Kit Gr. 4-8

Guitar K- Gr. 4

Guitar Gr. 5-8

Woodwinds Gr. 1-5

Beginning Violin TK-Gr. 3

String Ensemble Gr. 4-8

ARTS ALIVE DANCE CURRICULUM GRADES K-4

Throughout the course, dance teachers help children develop skills on and off stage such as team building, collaboration, problem solving and leadership. The foundations of dance class begin with ballet and core warm ups connected to the technique or skills to be taught within the class. The students learn to use the whole body with creative and imaginary exercises to expand their knowledge of learning steps and different styles of dance. Once students have acquired basic core skills, Hip-Hop, Jazz or African dance steps will be added. Moves at fast tempos such as quick footwork and intricate arm movements will be implemented as students improve.

Overview:  Over 9 months of dance or one school year, students learn a minimum of 3 choreographed dance routines and perform for their community and festivals. Genres of dance include Jazz, Lyrical Ballet, Musical Theatre Dance, Hip-Hop, African, and Bollywood.

Arts Alive Equipment: Dance Spots, scarves and boom box

Curriculum for Ballet, Jazz, & Musical Theatre Dance: Intro to Dance K-4th Grade Standards
Introduce the 5 basic positions in ballet, have students learn to mirror the movement.  Add the 5 arm positions after they have started accomplishing the foot positions.  Each week focus/emphasize on another ballet element of the warm up to develop fundamental muscles for ballet.  Introduce correct articulation and alignment of feet, ankles, knees and pelvis.  Continuously develop core strength for correct alignment. CA 2.0 Creative Expression

Grade 2 – Development of Motor Skills and Technical Expertise 1.2 Show a variety of combinations of axial movements (e.g., swing and balanced shapes, turn and stretch, bend and twist).

Use imaginative and visual imagery as motivation such as balloons, butterfly or a fairy to help character based movement.  Encourage internal and external movement and focus. CA 2.0 Creative Expression

Grade 1 – Creation/Invention of Dance Movements 2.5 Develop a dance phrase that has a sense of unity.

Introduce the concept of spotting and simple swivel turns.  The spatial movements are broken into smaller sections for students to understand and successfully complete with proper alignment and ease.  Pathways and stage directions should be introduced.  Teach levels for shapes both low and high. CA 1.0 Artistic Perception

Grade 2 – Comprehension and Analysis of Dance Elements 1.4 Expand the ability to incorporate spatial concepts with movement problems.

Using games such as freeze dance to allow students to develop creative self-expression and new ways of moving.  Encourage students to watch other dancer’s shapes and creativity.  Spotlight creative ideas while others watch.  Use props to help emphasize the mood of the music and the movement quality. CA 2.0 Creative Expression

Grade 3 – Creation/Invention of Dance Movements 2.1 Create and improvise movement patterns and sequences.

 

Add chasses across the floor starting with slower tempo music working to quicker beats. Clapping on beat plus opportunities for dancing different tempos. Time signature using march, waltz time, 4/4 time, and 6/8 time. CA 1.0 Artistic Perception

Grade 2 – Comprehension and Analysis of Dance Elements 1.3 Perform short movement problems, emphasizing the element of time (e.g., varied tempos, rhythmic patterns, counting).

Using the dance spots, students will learn how to stand in concentric circles, lines, arced lines and windows. The teacher then takes the dance spot away and the same spacing is encouraged in order for students to feel the shape created by the group.  Give the students a chance to start or end in different shapes. CA 2.0 CREATIVE EXPRESSION

Grade 3 – Application of Choreographic Principles and Processes to Creating Dance
2.4 Create a wide variety of shapes and movements, using different levels in space.

Students should practice being in time with the music.  Have dancers sit in a circle and clap to the beat of different music from different cultures.  Flamenco, African, Salsa allows students to learn strong beats each week to build help their ability to move in time. CA 3.0 Historical and Cultural Content

Grade 2 – Development of Dance
3.3 Name and perform rhythms from different cultures (e.g., through clapping, stomping, and using whole body movement).

Perform dance routine without dance instructor. Have students describe how dance makes them feel.  Students to perform their memorized dance in different directions or to change of tempo and asked to state how they feel. Professional dance films are shared. CA 4.0 Aesthetic Valuing

Grade 1 – Meaning and Impact of Dance

4.1 Use basic dance vocabulary to identify and describe a dance observed or performed
(e.g., shapes, levels, directions, tempo/fast-slow).

 

Explanation of “port de bras” both visually and verbal definition within the history of ballet terms. Terms are written as well as spoken by students. Leaps jumps, hops and skips developed with traditional music. CA 3.0 Historical and Cultural Content

Grade 2 – Development of Dance
3.1 Name and perform social and traditional dances from various cultures.

Read short passage from book or a poem that inspires creativity in student’s dancing.  Or play a piece of music and have students try 4 bars each in their own style.  Encourage directional changes, skills from class or concepts of dance – space, time and energy. CA 5.0 Connections, Relationships, Applications

Grade 2- Connections and Applications Across Disciplines

5.1 Use literature to inspire dance ideas
(e.g., poem, cartoon, nursery rhyme).

Music for curriculum includes (short clips-not always full songs)

  • The Muppet Show
  • Candy Man
  • Linus and Lucy
  • Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
  • Swing Dance numbers: Jump Town, I Wanna Be like You (Jungle Book)
  • Everybody wants to be Cat
  • Sunshine Girl
  • Twinkle Little Star (Tiny Boppers)
  • Nutcracker (Chinese Tea)
  • Over the Rainbow (Tiny Boppers)
  • My Favorite Things (for plies)
  • CD Ballet for CD

Costumes available: Canes, bowler hats, trilby hats, flower head bands, ballet skirts, fairy outfits, white gowns.

Curriculum for Ballet & Jazz and Dance Performance Grades 5-8

Overview:  The foundations of dance always start with ballet and core warm ups.  The students learn to create artistic dance which are developing – create solo or duets within the team ensemble.  Students should understand energy and dynamic and expression.

Use costumes and traditional dance skirts.

Arts Alive Equipment: Dance spots, scarves

Curriculum for Ballet, Jazz, Musical Theatre, and  Dance Performance Grades 5-8 Standards
Students learn how to dance in small and large spaces using levels, floor work and dynamic movement such as leaps and turns.  Music is used by the teacher to show magnitude and force of movement.  Styles such as Fosse, Martha Graham to show contemporary looseness of movement. 1.0   ARTISTIC PERCEPTION

Grade 5 – Comprehension and Analysis of Dance Elements

1.3 Demonstrate a greater dynamic range in movement utilizing space, time, and force/energy concepts.

Warm ups are developed with mirroring so dancers learn to work in pairs.  Echoing is taught by having students mimic the teacher’s movement and interpreting it using intricate movement.  Choreography is developed which requires precision and ripple type movement where timing is required. 2.0   CREATIVE EXPRESSION

Grade 5 – Development of Partner & Group Skills

2.6 Demonstrate cooperation, collaboration, and empathy in working with partners and in groups (e.g., leading/following, mirroring, and calling/responding, echoing, opposing).

 

 

During dance routine, students apply strong, straight arms with energy coming through to fingertips, extended legs, pointed toes in jumps. Teacher offers exercises and barre work that strengthen students balance and core.  Work on using space. CA 1.0 Artistic Perception

Grade 7 – Development of Motor Skills and Technical Expertise

1.3 Demonstrate risk taking in generating bigger and stronger movements through space in rehearsal and performance.

Teach tombe, pas de bourree, developing into jete across the floor.  Teach chaine, releve, chaine plie, into axels across the floor.  Changes in tempo of music are offered each week to build ability in speed and agility with movement. CA 1.0 Artistic Perception

Grade 7 – Development of Motor Skills and Technical Expertise

1.2 Demonstrate increased ability and skill to sustain longer and more complex movement sequences for expression in a variety of dance styles.

Teachers show books/DVDs to show dances from past and connection to different cultures.  Often costumes are added to allow students to work in longer skirts – or period costumes. Using long skirts can developed. CA 3.0 Historical and Cultural Content

Grade 7 – History and Function of Dance

3.2 Explain the function of dance in daily life during specific time periods and in countries being studied in history social science.

Explain to students what makes dance choreography appealing to the eye and ask them what they enjoy about their dance routine. Improve areas in regards to spatial layout and control of group’s movement.  Discuss art forms: I see, I think, I wonder? CA 4.0 Aesthetic Valuing

Grade 6 – Description, Analysis, and Criticism of Dance

4.1 Apply knowledge of the elements of dance and the craft of choreography to critiquing (spatial design, variety, contrast, clear structure).

Using the lights on stage (if available) to build mood; using lack of music to create silent dance; bring in instrument (percussion) rhythm sticks or puili sticks CA 5.0 Connections, Relationships, Applications

Grade 6 – Connections and Applications across disciplines. Describe how other arts disciplines are integrated into dance performances (e.g., music, lighting, set design).

Students create rhythmic phrases at least once a month to diverse music to understand processes of creation. (Suggest as a cool down) CA 2.0 Creative Expression

Grade 7 – Application of Choreographic Principles and Processes to Creating Dance

2.3 Demonstrate the ability to use dance elements to develop dance phrases reflecting various musical rhythms, styles, and dynamics.

Show dance excerpts on YouTube or PBS sites on various career opportunities in dance and that it is possible to have a career in dance:  dance instructor, performance team, musical theatre, dance therapist. CA 5.0 Connections, Relationships, Applications

Grade 7 – Development of Life Skills and Career Competencies

5.4 Research and compare careers in dance and dance-related fields.

Explain to students the difference in high-energy movement from hip-hop compared to other dances.  Fast paced street dance yet incorporating core ballet and jazz techniques.

 

 

1.0   ARTISTIC PERCEPTION

Grade 8 – Development of Motor Skills and Technical Expertise

1.3 Demonstrate greater technical control in generating bigger and stronger movements through space in rehearsal and performance.

Teacher brings three songs and the student creates a movement to each song which has different meter and style.  The students then discuss personal choices and the movement within each personal choice to expand their dance vocabulary. 2.0   CREATIVE EXPRESSION

Grade 8 – Application of Choreographic Principles and Processes to Creating Dance

2.3 Apply basic music elements to the making and performance of dances (e.g., rhythm, meter, accents).

Water and the use of hydration is taught on day one. Diet and energy foods for dance are always mentioned with younger students.  Older students are made aware of the de-stress benefits of dance. 5.0 CONNECTIONS, RELATIONSHIPS, APPLICATIONS

Grade 8 – Connections and Applications Across Disciplines

5.2 Describe how dancing builds positive mental, physical, and health-related practices (e.g., discipline, stress management, anatomic awareness).

Music used includes: (short clips)

  • Lyrical: Vow by Meredith Moore
  • Blackbird
  • Girls Just Wanna Have Fun
  • Film Music from Skyfall
  • Swing Dance numbers: Choo Choo Cha Boogie
  • Ballet Music from Classics
  • All that Jazz from Chicago
  • Overture from Chicago
  • Moves like Jagger (Kids Bop version)
  • Singing in the shower (Becky G)

All music must be cleared with the office before choreographing

Costumes available: Canes, bowler hats, trilbie hats, flower head bands, ballet skirts, fairy outfits, white gowns.

DRAMA FOR KINDERGARTEN – GRADE 3

OVERVIEW:

    • Students will learn to work as a team working towards performance. Storytelling will be used to develop students’ imagination and creativity and gain vocal projection and a clearly articulated vocal tone. Games are part of every class to teach specific life skills such as focus, picking up verbal cues, and gaining confidence to speak in public. Verse speaking as a group will be taught as well as scripts from diverse cultures. Character development will be taught through puppets, improvisation and pantomime, in order to develop physical and vocal skills.  Performances are given throughout the school year.  Students will learn to analyze their performances and help each other improve through constructive criticism.

 

  • Over (3) 8-week Sessions, each student should be introduced to –
        • How to develop beginning, middle, and ends of a story with varying endings
        • Speech work – How to ask questions, when to ask questions using pace, tone, inflection, pause and pitch
        • Using the correct voice on stage and focus for an audience through games
        • Developing characters through puppets, mask and physicality
        • Devising stories from pantomime (one form each week), tableau, improvisation or using props games that develop the imagination and use different objects to create watchable scenes
        • Working as a team and controlling the body and voice in all performances
        • Learning to be a good audience member with constructive feedback skills to other performers
        • Some musical theatre songs to develop ways to tell a story via music and script
    Activities Standards
    Weekly Activity 1:  Establish the student’s outside voice, stage voice with simple tongue twisters, breathing & vocal exercises. Practice the tongue twister once (written on board) break it down into smaller parts.  Improvise the tongue twisters or exercise with different endings. Teach good posture and ask to go back to that if student are squirmy. Students should be taught to stand on two feet with good breathing habits and corrected every week. Grade 2

    Comprehension and Analysis of the Elements of Theatre

    1.2 Use body and voice to improvise alternative endings to a story.

     

    Weekly Activity 2:  Students develop characters physically through pantomime, puppets, using masks and vocal changes. Often props such as hats are brought to evolve the creation of characters.

     

    Grade 1

    2.1 Demonstrate skills in pantomime, tableau, and improvisation.

     

    Storytelling: Story telling is told in three ways:

    1. Round circle with each student giving a phrase to add to the story

    2. Taking a fantasy or fairy tale story and adding new endings (what if?)

    ·         Over three lessons take story points and focus on that area through a familiar story. e.g. Red Riding Hood

    3.  Puppets may be used once students have an understanding of story structure

    Grade 2

    2.2 Retell familiar stories, sequencing story points and identifying character, setting, and conflict.

    Creation/Invention in Theatre
    2.2 Dramatize or improvise familiar simple stories from classroom literature or life experiences, incorporating plot (beginning, middle, and end) and using a tableau or a pantomime.

    Physical Activity

    Leading to vocal and acting exercises:  Students act out a letter of the alphabet as pairs or individuals: have them make either horizontally or on the floor.  Spelling the word DRAMA with their bodies continue as pairs for difficult letters to encourage team work. Choose other easy words (ACTORS) and have them decipher which word it is. This should lead to that student saying the word in their inside and outside voice. When the group has the full word – have them repeat in different tones. Finally ask which is most effective and why?

    Development of Theatrical Skills

    2.1 Perform in group improvisational theatrical games that develop cooperative skills and concentration.

    Critical Assessment of Theatre

    4.1 Critique an actor’s performance as to the use of voice, gesture, facial expression, and movement to create character.

    Group speaking is developed to help younger students to pick up cues and listen to each other. A wide range of literature should be used- poems, prose, and their own creation. Group speaking helps shyer students gain confidence with solo speaking.

    Within the group speaking, the creation of mood is taught so students can make choices on the words to change the mood upon.

    History of Theatre

    3.2 Identify universal characters in stories and plays from different periods and places.

    Performance:  The teacher reads the first line/verse of poem and has the students repeat (copies are not given out to younger nonreaders).  The students act it out, repeat poem standing still.  Ask “Which sounds better?” “Can we move and speak clearly?” Continue until you have four lines.  Send home a copy. Grade 2

    2.1 Perform in group improvisational theatrical games that develop cooperative skills and concentration

    Theatre Vocabulary: Students learn how to move around a stage learning the stage areas with stage area game. They learn about action and the role of an audience. Teachers highlight how performers must not pull focus from others speaking.  Sometimes masks can be used to build confidence in speaking/moving. Grade 3

    1.1 Use the vocabulary of theatre, such as character, setting, conflict, audience, motivation, props, stage areas, and blocking, to describe theatrical experiences.

    Acting Musical Theatre scenes are introduced where students are vocally able and the teacher can teach character through movement, and correct breathing for singing. Scenes start or finish with dialogue and will be edited to make short performance tableau.  Example Soldier, Soldier will you Marry Me? For the youngest students. The students are involved in simple costuming, props and staging of a group collaboration Grade 3

    Careers and Career-Related Skills

    5.2 Develop problem-solving and communication skills by participating collaboratively in theatrical experiences.

     

     

    Poems for Group Speaking:

        • Spaghetti by Jack Prelutsky
        • Going on a Treasure Hunt/Easter Egg Hunt
        • Island of Lost Socks
        • My Robot by Gareth Lancaster
        • The Eleven Skeletons Jack Prelutsky
        • The Dark, Dark House (Halloween)
        • The Hen and the Fox

     

    Scenes, Age 9 and Under:

        • The Rabbit with No Tail
        • The Ugly Duckling
        • Fish School
        • The Hare and the Tortoise
        • Duck on a Scooter adapted from children book
        • Scenes from How to Eat Like a Child
        • Missing Tarts
        • Phantom Tollbooth

    Stories to Choose from:

        • Jack and the Beanstalk
        • Hickory Dickory Dock
        • Man in the Moon
        • Aladdin and his Lamp
        • Ugly Duckling
        • Little Red Riding Hood
        • The Ugly Duckiing

     

    Musicals:

        • Annie (adapted) with Hard Knock Life
        • Oh Soldier, Soldier Will you Marry Me?
        • Bye, Bye Birdie (“Kids” acted as parents)
        • Part of Your World, Little Mermaid

     

    Drama Voice Exercises (Resource link)

  • PERFORMANCE ACTING FOR GRADES 4-8

    OVERVIEW:

    After a basic grounding in voice work, the students will work on group speaking to improve their intonation and projection. Students will learn to block scenes with the correct theatre language and mark up a script with mood and motivations to create believable characters. Students will perform historical and modern drama scripts and sometimes musical theatre scenes. Collaboration is encouraged for all students both writing and directing their own and published scenes. All students should be able to enter high school ready to audition for a part in a production.

    CA Visual and Performing Art Standards

    Grade 4

    1.2 Identify a character’s objectives and motivations to explain that character’s behavior.
    1.3 Demonstrate how voice (diction, pace, and volume) may be used to explore multiple possibilities for a live reading.

    Grade 5

    2.2 Demonstrate the use of blocking (stage areas, levels, and actor’s position, such as full front, quarter, profile, and full back) in dramatizations.

    Creation/Invention in Theatre
    2.3 Collaborate as an actor, director, scriptwriter, or technical artist in creating formal or informal theatrical performances.

    Grade 6

    Development of the Vocabulary of Theatre
    1.1 Use the vocabulary of theatre, such as action/reaction, vocal projection, subtext, theme, mood, design, production values, and stage crew, to describe theatrical experiences.

    Grade 7 History of Theatre 

    3.2 Compare and contrast various theatre styles throughout history, such as those of Ancient Greece, Elizabethan theatre, Kabuki theatre, Kathakali dance theatre, and commedia dell’arte.

     

    Objectives of the 8-Week Course Curriculum

    Grades 4-8 with age appropriate material

    Each student should be introduced and develop skills in:

        • Ability through warm up voice exercises related to the work to use the voice in different intonation, inflection, accents  and vocal projection for theatre work
        • Learn to use reactions, subtext, mood and have their characters develop motivation, setting of a scene, etc. for each script developed
        • Study the manners and style of  acting Shakespeare, Greek , Musical Theatre or  commedia dell’arte theatre
        • Use improvisation and games to create believable theatrical performances
        • Collaborate together to create formal performances for their school community and festivals with strong blocking and believable characters
        • Ability to develop strong character work in monologues or duets
        • Learn to block well written scripts and direct other short scenes for their peers

     

    As students advanced scripts can be written from different cultural themes and performed. Every 16 weeks a performance should be included within the course.

     

    Lesson strategies taught CA Standards
    Through warm up voice exercises related to the scripts the students learn to use the voice in different intonation, inflection, accents and vocal projection for theatre work.

    Ability to develop strong character work in monologues or duets. Students rehearse play reading, which is regularly attempted for student audiences.

    Grade 6

    Development of the Vocabulary of Theatre

    1.1  Use the vocabulary of theatre, such as action/reaction, vocal projection, subtext, theme, mood, design, production values, and stage crew, to describe theatrical experiences.

    Creation/Invention in Theatre

    2.2 Use effective vocal expression, gesture, facial expression, and timing to create character.

    Students collaborate to create formal performances for their school community and festivals with strong blocking and believable characters. Grade 5

    2.2 Demonstrate the use of blocking (stage areas, levels, and actor’s position, such as full front, quarter, profile, and full back) in dramatizations.

    Students learn to use reactions, subtext, mood and have their characters develop motivation, setting of a scene, etc. for each script developed.

    Use improvisation and games to create believable theatrical performances. Mask can be used to build physical behavior of a character,

    Grade 4

    1.2 Identify a character’s objectives and motivations to explain that character’s behavior

    Development of the Vocabulary of Theatre
    1.1 Use the vocabulary of theatre, such as action/reaction, vocal projection, subtext, theme, mood, design, production values, and stage crew, to describe theatrical experiences.

    Study of the manners and style of acting Shakespeare, Greek, Musical Theatre or commedia dell’arte theatre through monologues or duets from period drama- such as Shakespeare. Grade 7 History of Theatre 

    3.2 Compare and contrast various theatre styles throughout history, such as those of Ancient Greece, Elizabethan theatre, Kabuki theatre, Kathakali dance theatre, and commedia dell’arte.

    Students act and direct with their peers and the more experienced students can direct monologues and duets with others. If students have the writing skills they are also asked to script works for their peers to act. Grade 6 Creation/Invention in Theatre
    2.3 Collaborate as an actor, director, scriptwriter, or technical artist in creating formal or informal theatrical performances.Grade 8 2.2 Perform character-based improvisations, pantomimes, or monologues, using voice, blocking, and gesture to enhance meaning.

    Suggested scenes that may be used:

    Little Women

    Slappy – a Moral tale of a sign painter, Universe

    Tom Sawyer/Huckleberry Finn

    Scenes from How to Eat Like a Child,

    Greek plays The Birds, Helen of Troy,

    Witches by Roald Dahl,

    Three Witches from Shakespeare

    All the World’s a Stage from As You Like It

    Servant of Two Masters (Comedia)

    Adapted Stories for Grade 5 and Up:

Duets:

            Scientist Meets Fish

Monologues

            Lucy from Charlie Brown

            Cock a Doodle

            Charlie Brown

Musical Theatre:  The Boyfriend, My Fair Lady, Snoopy

Drums & Percussion Curriculum Kindergarten – Grade 3

Overview:

The study of wide range of percussion instruments from world drumming is also taught: African drumming styles, Latin American styles – Brazilian, Peruvian and Afro Cuban, Irish plus a wide variety of percussion.  The weekly drum lessons develop rhythm skills, interpretation and sound practice habits.  Students participate in a variety of musical activities in the lessons:  Hand percussion and drum kit, playing together and starting to note read rhythms. They learn how to put together the drum set and care for instruments.

After acquisition of basic playing skills in body percussion students acquire skills on at least 5 percussion instruments. Memorization of form is taught so progress is made in playing for performance. The study of wide range of percussion instruments from world drumming is also taught: samba, African, rock and classical repertoire. Students are taught to develop musicianship, developing sound practice techniques.  Students can also learn how to listen to other students performing and offer positive feedback.

Performance opportunities in which students are encouraged to play at least every 8 weeks:
Performances include recitals, lunchtime concerts, and Fiestas.

Curriculum for Drums & Percussion Standards
Proper standing and sitting postures for drums as well as the correct way to play metal and wood percussion. Holding sticks correctly with wrist action. 1.0  Artistic Perception

1.1 Use icons or invented symbols to represent beat.

Demonstrate rhythms. Drawing different notes values on the staff. Playing notes on xylophone while other students play unhitched percussion such as cowbell, tambour, guiro etc. Teachers use a circle and move students around a couple of instruments each week – until they know the names of all percussion and how to play correctly. Games such as “Icka back Soda Cracker” to help develop rhythmic dictation. 1.0 Artistic Perception – Read and Notate Music
1.1 Read, write, and perform simple rhythmic patterns, using eighth notes, quarter notes, half notes, and rests. (Grade 2)
Hand drums are introduced from different cultures.  They develop timbre on djembe or doumbek hand drums with hand techniques.

Call and response is used to teach basic beat patterns.

Students recite weekly rhythm games singing, counting out loud and clapping beats to drum rhythms.

Playing exercises together, on sticks and hand drums are encouraged to develop all students’ ability to play tempo starting with body percussion.

Listen to, Analyze, and Describe Music
1.3 Identify melody, rhythm, harmony, and timbre in selected pieces of music when presented aurally. (Grade 3)Compose, Arrange, and Improvise2.4 Create short rhythmic and melodic phrases in question-and-answer form.
Students regularly explore the different drums with dynamic sensitivity encompassing African, Latin, and Irish drumming.

Students play parts of drum kit from different periods of American rock and from other cultures.

Role of Music
3.1 Identify the uses of music in various cultures and time periods. (Grade 3)
Introduction to simple dynamics via the xylophone and pitched mellophones are used to  understand mallet skills. Simple forms of arpeggio and intervals are played in rounds for comprehension of patterns. Students listen to instrumental and vocal cues to learn and play from.

 

KinderCompose, Arrange, and Improvise

2.4 Create accompaniments, using the voice or a variety of classroom instruments.

 

Derive Meaning     4.1 Create movements to music that reflect focused listening.

 

Students explore within a historical context instruments and their country of origin.  Throughout the year students play songs for different world holidays such as Christmas & Hanukkah, where Peruvian (the cajon) and Afro Cuban rhythms are explored.

 

Mood and ideas are discussed and their emotions in relation to music. Irish drum music helps to build playing speed.

4.0 AESTHETIC VALUING Responding to, Analyzing, and Making Judgments About Works of Music

4.3 Describe how specific musical elements communicate particular ideas or moods in music. (Grade 3)

Identify patterns within performance piece through repeated phrases.  Make a connection between musical patterns ,dynamic playing and tempo

 

Playing exercises together, on sticks and hand drums are encouraged to develop all students’ ability to play tempo starting with body percussion.

4.2 Describe how ideas or moods are communicated through music.(grade 1)

Grade 2

Connections and Applications

    5.1 Identify similar themes in drums, songs, and art forms (e.g., patterns, texture).

Drums & Percussion Curriculum Grade 4 – Grade 8

Overview:

During this age group the concepts of tempo is delivered by adding dynamics every time the students play. Two hands are used on all rhythm patterns, 1/16 notes are introduced. Strong choices of interpretation and sound practice habits are taught as well.

Students participate in a variety of music activities in the lessons:  drum set, timbales and congas, and able to set up and learn maintenance of a drum set playing together and drum note reading.

Hand drum techniques advance using the whole hand plus the study of wide range of percussion instruments and their historical relevance from world drumming: samba, African, rock and classical repertoire. Students can also learn how to listen to other students performing and offer positive comments.  By this stage students are taught how to play drum kit with click track, pre-recorded tracks or with piano plus hand drumming posture and hand techniques are developed.  Students are often mixed ability from grade 5 -8.

Performance opportunities in which students are encouraged to play frequently:
Performances include recitals, lunchtime concerts, and Fiesta.

Curriculum for Drum Kit Standards
In the older grades students play repertoire together – students can play the whole song; intermediates can play hand drums such as timbales, congas and claves to learn the blend of ensemble playing.

Students need to learn to follow a conductor and learn basic conducting skills.

2.2 Use classroom instruments to play melodies and accompaniments from a varied repertoire of music from diverse cultures, including rounds, descants, and ostinatos and two-part harmony, by oneself and with others. (Grade 5)
Students play along to beat tracks and instrumental tracks. They learn to have the ability to solo and develop their own songs through improvisation. Students will play to a metronome when required.

 

Technique should include singles to rolls, controlling the bounce of the sticks with 3 and 4 strokes, flams and paradiddles.

 

 

The class or teacher, play songs using different dynamics and tempos are discussed.

 

Students are taught how to memorize the form of a song as well as how to break down into sections.

Compose, Arrange, and Improvise
2.6 Improvise simple melodies. (Grade 6)2.2 Use classroom instruments to play melodies and accompaniments from a varied repertoire of music from diverse cultures including rounds, descants, and ostinatos, by oneself and with others. (Grade 5)Analyze and Critically Assess
4.1 Identify and analyze differences in tempo and dynamics in contrasting music selections. (Grade 5)Diversity of Music
3.2 Play memorized songs from diverse cultures. (Grade 5)
Solo’s call and response with other musicians, drum fills, tag endings, transitions are taught to develop style and expression on a variety of songs

 

Students learn more advanced drum notations and how to read different instrument parts on a score. Music is introduced which teaches students how to count complex rests over many bars.

2.3 Perform on an instrument a repertoire of instrumental literature representing various genres, styles, and cultures with expression, technical accuracy, tone quality, and articulation, by oneself and in ensembles (level of difficulty: 1 on a scale of 1-6). (Grade 6)
Students play at frequent recitals or performances for their peers and learn to assess the music played and learn relative merits of sound.

 

After each class/performance students will assess their performances. Evaluation is made after each new song and their preferences are considered by the teacher.

 

 

Students are asked to play with other instrumental disciplines (strings, winds) or watch their performances and make critiques on what they can improve on to make it a better performance both musically and presentation.

 

Students play music from classics, rock, jazz, Latin and world music. They learn to play percussion repertoire in many styles throughout the 2nd year in percussion and drums.

4.0 AESTHETIC VALUING

Analyze and Critically Assess
4.1 Use specific criteria when judging the relative quality of musical performances. (Grade 5)

Careers and Career-Related Skills
5.4 Evaluate improvement in personal musical performances after practice or rehearsal.

Role of Music
3.1 Compare music from two or more cultures of the world as to the functions the music serves and the roles of musicians. (Grade 6)

Diversity of Music
3.3 Describe distinguishing characteristics of representative musical genres and styles from performances.

Drum Teachers meet 2 times a year to share materials improve curriculum and receive teacher training. Note Our curriculum is always a work in progress.

Songs:

Younger:

Take me out to the ball game

Spooky Halloween

When the Saints Comes Marching In

Chop-Suey

Older:

Camina Burrina

In the mood

Cuban melty

Wipe out

Guitar Curriculum Kindergarten – Grade 4

Overview:
In the past we have developed a list of songs that should be taught and books such as Everybody’s Guitar Method should only be used in second or third year training.

The weekly guitar lessons develop playing skills, interpretation and sound practice habits.  Students participate in variety of music activities in the lessons: playing chords, singing back songs for pitch and reading of simple rhythms.  Tablature should NOT BE taught as the only method to read music – it can be used aside note reading or chord reading. This is considered a tool for learning not a skill transferable to music on other instruments.

Reading of notes is only encouraged after acquisition of basic playing skills but some memorization is more important so progress is made in playing for performance. The study of wide range of repertoire from as many stylistic types of music as possible: children’s songs, folk, rock, pop and classical.

Students are taught to develop musicianship, developing strumming techniques, and ear training.  Students can also learn how to listen to other students’ performing and offer positive comments.

Opportunities on Performances students are encouraged to play at least every 8 weeks:
This allows motivated students to play in public  plus regular recitals. Student performances should be given for day care and lunchtime concerts.

Curriculum for Guitar Standards
Guitar Grades 2-4 Our classes are often mixed age group grade 2-4
 Correct  standing and sitting posture for guitar, fingering positions, strumming
Demonstrate rhythms on the guitar and clapping while counting. Drawing different note values on the staff. Singing notes back while other students play tunes.  Rhythm game.

Learning to play on first three strings, strumming and fingerings to build technique and movement across the guitar.

Grade 2 – 1.0 Artistic Perception – Read and Notate Music
1.1 Read, write, and perform simple rhythmic patterns, using eighth notes, quarter notes, half notes, and rests.
1.2 Read, write, and perform simple patterns of pitch, using solfege (guitar).
Recite weekly string notes and play games, count out loud and clap beat to guitar rhythms.  Students regularly explore the guitar with dynamic sensitivity.

Playing exercises together is encouraged to develop all students’ abilities to play tempo together.

Grade 3 Listen to, Analyze, and Describe Music
1.3 Identify melody, rhythm, harmony, and timbre in selected pieces of music when presented aurally.
Songs should be chosen from the list below. Students play different periods of music and American folk music plus from other cultures Grade 3 Role of Music
3.1 Identify the uses of music in various cultures and time periods.
Legato, staccato, arpeggio, and introduction to simple picking styles.  Accent certain beats.  Teach syncopation by both groups playing syncopated phrases. Grade 4 1.0 Artistic Perception – Listen to, Analyze, and Describe Music    1.4 Describe music according to its elements, using the terminology of music.
Students throughout the year play songs in different holidays such as Christmas, May Day and Martin Luther King holidays.

Mood and ideas are discussed and their emotions in relation to music.

4.0 AESTHETIC VALUING Responding to, Analyzing, and Making Judgments About Works of Music

Grade 3 4.3 Describe how specific musical elements communicate particular ideas or moods in music.

As students rehearse for a concert the patterns in other art forms are pointed out to be similar to music – any discipline that is repeated like music. Grade 4 Connections and Applications
5.1 Identify the use of similar elements in music and other art forms (e.g., form, pattern, rhythm)

Guitar Curriculum Grade 5 – Grade 8

Guitar Overview Grade 5-8

By this stage students are taught how to tune their guitars either with piano or electronic tuners

Students are often mixed ability from grade 5 -8.
In the older grades students play rock songs together in harmony so advanced students can play the tune, improvers can play chords and beginners simple one string to learn the intricacies of band playing. Grade 5 2.2 Use classroom instruments to play melodies and accompaniments from a varied repertoire of music from diverse cultures, including rounds, descants, and ostinatos and two-part harmony, by oneself and with others.
Plus students play along to beat tracks and instrumental tracks.  See list below. They then the ability to solo and develop their own songs through improvise.

 

Blues and penatonic scales are taught so blues music can be covered and its connection to popular music.

 

 

 

Songs are played at different dynamic by the class and tempos are discussed, plus played with a metronome.

 

Music is taught from different cultures and periods

Grade 6 Compose, Arrange, and Improvise

2.6 Improvise simple melodies.

Grade 5 2.2 Use classroom instruments to play melodies and accompaniments from a varied repertoire of music from diverse cultures. including rounds, descants, and ostinatos, by oneself and with others

Grade 5 Analyze and Critically Assess
4.1 Identify and analyze differences in tempo and dynamics in contrasting music selections.

Grade 5 Diversity of Music
3.2 Play memorized songs from diverse cultures.

Lead playing is established for band experience and how to take a solo.  Lead breaks from songs such as Smoke on the Water, Iron man etc. Grade 6 2.3 Perform on an instrument a repertoire of instrumental literature representing various genres, styles, and cultures with expression, technical accuracy, tone quality, and articulation, by oneself and in ensembles (level of difficulty: 1 on a scale of 1-6).
Students play at lunchtime informal recitals or performances for their peers and learn to assess the music played and learn relative merits of sound.

 

 

 

 

After each performance students will assess their performances. Evaluation is made after new song and their preferences considered by the teacher.

 

 

 

 

Students are asked to play for dancers, play with other instrumental disciplines or watch their performances and make critiques on what makes music listenable or watchable.

Grade 5 4.0 AESTHETIC VALUING

Students critically assess and derive meaning from works of music and the performance of musicians according to the elements of music, aesthetic qualities, and human responses.

Analyze and Critically Assess
4.1 Use specific criteria when judging the relative quality of musical performances.

Careers and Career-Related Skills
5.4 Evaluate improvement in personal musical performances after practice or rehearsal.

Grade 6 Role of Music
3.1 Compare music from two or more cultures of the world as to the functions the music serves and the roles of musicians.
Diversity of Music
3.3 Describe distinguishing characteristics of representative musical genres and styles from performances.
3.5 Classify by style and genre a number of exemplary musical works and explain the characteristics that make each work exemplary.

Guitar Teachers meet 3 times a year to share materials improve curriculum and receive teacher training. Our curriculum is always a work in progress.
 

Guitar Songs for younger  groups of students

 

Guitar Songs with tracks for older  groups of students

Run Around Sue(track) Happy Together (track)
Take me Out to The Ball Game Freight Train –Taj Mahal
Sweet Home Alabama Mean Jam Blues Blind Lemon Jefferson
Rudolph Red Nose Reindeer Key C 2,4,6,8 Motorway
Oh Bl De ObLa Do – Beatles Run around Sue
Oh Susanna Ventura Highway
This Little Light of Mine When September Ends – Green Day
Chim Chim Cheree Stir It Up – Bob Marley
It’s a Small World Free Fallin – Tom Petty
Take me Out to the Ball Game Website with songs Guitar Noise/Classic Campfire Songs
Songs to Use with Younger Students
Both sides Now (Arpeggios)
Guitarzan
Happy – Pharrel
Ukulele Train
Edelweiss (3/4 Time)
I Got Rhythm
Hey Jude
Skyfall (Piano Arpeggios)
Rock Around the Clock
Side by Side
Try to Remember
You’ve Got a Friend
When You Wish Upon
Small World
Yellow Submarine
What a Wonderful World
Splish Splash
Simpson Theme
Don’t Worry Be Happy
One Love
The Cups Song /Anne Kendrick (Percussion)
Best Day of My Life

 

Note– if the students are taught to sing along from the introduction of the song it will make their timing better and pitch for tuning guitar.  Be creative – not all sing but they can use guitar as percussion get audience to clap along and start playing in chorus.

Each class will start with a warm up and a challenge chord or scale for students who are more advanced.


ARTS ALIVE ROCK BAND CURRICULUM
GRADES 6-8

OVERVIEW:

The purpose of this class is to teach students how to work as team and play music that covers rock, pop & rhythm and blues.  Some musical training is required to be considered for this class; therefore students are chosen through audition. Students will learn to set up PA, microphones and equipment as part of the class.

It is an 8 month commitment for students Grade 5 and above (younger students may audition if they have played their instrument for two years).  Support will be given to the Rock Band teacher by Arts Alive staff who teach guitar, keyboard and drums in the after school program.

All instruments will be considered: Keyboard, Bass Guitar and Guitar Electric and Acoustic, Woodwinds, Drums, Percussion and Vocals

Audition: Each player should be able to play up to 24 bars of music in 4/4 time (from memory) using  basic first position chords, power chords  for guitar and piano – major and minor chords.  Other instruments such as violin or saxophone – will be included on a case by case basis and music will be adapted to fit band player’s talents. 

If students do not get in the first time they should be able to audition their skills halfway through the school year.  Students, who need more work on their playing skills in chords and fills, should take an Arts Alive crash course for a month to acquire those skills (or take private lesson).  Equally, singers need some vocal training – one free lesson is offered by Arts Alive Director but students should take as many lessons as they can afford.

During Rock Classes the following will be taught:

Working as a team

Learning to set up and tune instruments

Building a repertoire  together

Performance presentation

Singing harmony with lead singer

Soloing with other musicians

Sight reading lead sheets

Varied popular music from 1960-2015

Curriculum Monthly Check List

Month 1-2: 

The Rock Band team will start by building their music skill.

Students will learn a new song each 8-week session with 2-3 song performances and be given music to rehearse at home.

Drummers will learn basic straight 1/8 and set up and breakdown of kit.

Bass players find the roots on 3-4 string will support the band with strong rehearsed team work with rhythm section.

Vocalists will be challenged to learn lead sheets with memorized words, carry their tune in pitch when not being played by an instrument and sing back up when not taking lead vocal. They will learn to sing in different keys and learn microphone technique.

Guitar electric power chords on 6th Acoustic players open string chords – such as Am, C,E, G. (or whatever the chosen songs chose require).

Keyboards will be able to play and construct major chords/triads and play some melody line to help singers.

Month 3-5:

Students start working towards a performance by memorizing strong structure so students acquire a range of physical and expressive techniques.

All players are experimenting with a range of dynamics in first year.

Drummers should know basic straight 1/8 bass drum variations on straight 1/8 plus add fills that set up segue ways between forms in a song. The 2nd year drummer will know open and closed hi-hat patterns, shuffle.

Bass players find the roots on 3-4 string add root octaves plus he or she will support the band with strong rehearsed teamwork with rhythm section.  Drummers and bass players will learn to lead the band, control the song form and develop pick up transitions.  Advanced players in 2nd or 3rd year of rock syncopated eighths.

Vocalists will learn back up and harmonies when not taking lead vocal. Singers need to learn the structure of songs with verse chorus and breaks. Singers will practice with supplemental back up CD with harmonies and warm ups. Singers should work on vibrato and resonance.  They should add percussion (tambourine, cow bell, etc) on select songs.

Guitar electric power chords on 6th string and 5th string- single note tricks. Acoustic player’s rhythm transitions comfortable steady strong strum. Play songs including single note riffs with chords, simple legato, staccato and slides, as well as simple dynamics.

Keyboards should play with two hands plus have different voices on some songs. Major and Minor inversions should be introduced.

A Christmas performance will feature 2 band songs of different styles with solos at an appropriate time in December.

Month 6-8:

Players will be able to read song charts quicker and add two songs a month to the expanding repertoire by reading lead sheets.

A final performance will be planned with select players using more than one instrument: voice and guitar/keys and guitar.

All players should use a range of physical and expressive techniques with confidence.  Instrumentalists will learn control over tone and sound adjustments to suit the playing style of the song.

Each year on instrumental should be attempted.

Drummers will experiment and add more percussion to songs.

Bass improves with strong, inventive bass lines and fills.

Vocalists should work on their emotional performance and ways to strengthen their presentation and learn to connect with an audience.

Guitarists learn damping, legato and staccato, slides, and accents.

Keyboards should be playing several voices within a song (strings, brass, and vibrato) plus foot pedal effects.

May-June:  A final recital performance will be held with a four to five song set to be decided by the teacher and group.

Notes:  Each year keep adding to list of appropriate songs.

YEARLY SONG LIST

Music will be chosen to suit instruments plus be chosen from 1960-2015.  Students will do research on YouTube to find different versions of the songs. Different songs from each era should be wide and teach different skills such as:

Beginning songs including but not limited to:

Everyday People

Werewolf in London

Blitzreig Bop

Brass in Pocket

Lonely Boy

Jump

Don’t Stop Beleivin

2nd year songs including but not limited to:

Canons (Christian Rock)

Sweet Child of Mine – Guns and Roses

Rolling in the Deep – Adele

Spirit in the sky

Rock House – Ray Charles (instrumental)

Help – Beatles

Found What I’m Looking – U2

Waiting – Greenday

I Love Rock n Roll

Green Onions (instrumental)

The Climb

NB: Students must know they have choices of music but music/lyrics must be deemed appropriate by director.

CA Visual and Performing Arts Standards

Grade 6 Standards

Read and Notate Music

1.1    Read, write, and perform intervals and triads.

 

Listen to, Analyze, and Describe Music

1.5 Analyze and compare the use of musical elements representing various genres and cultures, emphasizing meter and rhythm.

 

Apply Vocal and Instrumental Skills

2.1 Sing a repertoire of vocal literature representing various genres, styles, and cultures with expression, technical accuracy, good posture, tone quality, and vowel shape written and memorized, by oneself and in ensembles (level of difficulty: 1 on a scale of 1-6).

2.3 Perform on an instrument a repertoire of instrumental literature representing various genres, styles, and cultures with expression, technical accuracy, tone quality, and articulation, by oneself and in ensembles (level of difficulty: 1 on a scale of 1-6).

 

Compose, Arrange, and Improvise

2.6 Improvise simple melodies.

 

Role of Music

3.3 Describe distinguishing characteristics of representative musical genres and styles from two or more cultures.

 

Analyze and Critically Assess

4.2 Explain how various aesthetic qualities convey images, feeling, or emotion.

 

 

Grade 7 Standards

Apply Vocal and Instrumental Skills

2.1 Sing a repertoire of vocal literature representing various genres, styles, and cultures with expression,       technical accuracy, tone quality, vowel shape, and articulation written and memorized, by oneself and in ensembles (level of difficulty: 2 on a scale of 1-6).

Compose, Arrange, and Improvise

2.6 Improvise melodies and harmonic accompaniments.

2.7 Improvise melodic and rhythmic embellishments and variations on given pentatonic melodies.

Connections and Applications

5.2 Identify and describe how music functions in the media and entertainment industries.

Careers and Career-Related Skills

5.3 Identify various careers for musicians in the entertainment industry.

Grade 8 Standards

Read and Notate Music

1.1 Read, write, and perform augmented and diminished intervals, minor chords, and harmonic minor progressions.

1.3 Transcribe aural examples into rhythmic and melodic notation.

Listen to, Analyze, and Describe Music

1.7 Explain how musical elements are used to create specific music events in given aural examples.

Apply Vocal and Instrumental Skills

2.3 Perform on an instrument a repertoire of instrumental literature representing various genres, styles, and cultures with expression, technical accuracy, tone quality, and articulation, by oneself and in ensembles (level of difficulty: 3 on a scale of 1-6).

Role of Music

3.1 Compare and contrast the functions music serves and the place of musicians in society in various cultures.

Analyze and Critically Assess

4.2 Apply detailed criteria appropriate for the genre and style of the music to evaluate the quality and effectiveness of performances, compositions, arrangements, and improvisations, by oneself and others.

Connections and Applications

5.2 Describe how music is composed and adapted for use in film, video, radio, and television.

 

Beginning Keyboard Curriculum Kindergarten – Grade 3

Overview:

The intent behind this curriculum is to establish creativity not rote playing.  The weekly keyboard lessons will help students develop tactile instrumental skills, interpretation and practice habits when playing the keyboard.  Students participate in variety of musical activities during the lessons:  playing, singing and reading notes in both chords and alphabetical form.  The students play age appropriate songs from as many stylistic types of music as possible.  Students are taught to play to the beat with simple right hand songs and progressively apply chords on the left hand while acquiring ear/pitch training.  Students will also play with others as a group and learn how to listen to other students’ perform and offer positive feedback.

Recitals are held for all Arts Alive Schools allowing motivated students to play in public.  Every child has chance to play in informal recitals for other students and formal recitals at the end of the year.

Curriculum for Keyboard Standards
Proper sitting posture, hands, and finger positions are taught.  Younger students learn black and white keys (snow and mountains) in creative ways from stories. 1.0               Artistic Perception
1.1  Use icons or invented symbols to represent beat.
Original stories are created on the keyboard.  Pictures on computer/cards are shown of animals running or fast asleep.  The students play in slow tempo or fast tempo (extend to seasons – rain, wind, etc.).  Students are encouraged at home to tell the story on their keyboard to family members.  Moods are created and communicated to an audience through stories. Compose, Arrange, and Improve (Grade 1)

1.4 Improve simple rhythmic accompaniments using body percussion or classroom instruments.

Derive Meaning

4.1 Create movements to music that reflect focused listening.

4.2 Describe how ideas or moods are communicated though music.

Stories are told from children’s literature; e.g., Jump Frog Jump, which leads to songwriting with simple notes on the keyboard.  Students create the chorus of the song and as each part of the story unfolds, play and sing it.  Plus as the student advances, creates mood songs which helps create mini solo songs. 2.0 Creative Expression

Apply Vocal and Instrumental Skills

2.3 Play instruments and move or verbalize to demonstrate awareness of beat, tempo, dynamics, and melodic direction. (Kindergarten)

Demonstrate note values through the keyboard, flashcards, and clapping while counting.  Card games finding the correct note on the keyboard.  Singing notes back as students play tunes (Do-Re-Mi).  Playing creative piano fingerings to build technique and movement across the keyboard  (rain arpeggios).  Scales with different finger positions with skipping fingers for coordination.  Halloween songs with lower spooky keys introduce a much bigger keyboard to younger students.  Animals are also introduced for higher keys – students have them running, stopping, jumping through sale like exercises.  Scales are time for creative thinking. 1.0   Artistic Perception

Read and Notate Music

1.1 Read, write, and perform simple rhythmic patterns using eighth notes, quarter notes, half notes, and rests.

 

Recite finger numbers and play games, count out loud, and clap beats to keyboard rhythms.  Students regularly explore the keyboard with dynamic sensitivity through playing simply to a picture.  Playing exercises together is encouraged to develop all students’ ability to play tempo together.  Students sing and play the musical alphabet. 2.0 Creative Expression
Apply Vocal and Instrumental Skills2.3 Play instruments and move or verbalize to demonstrate awareness of beat, tempo, dynamics, and melodic direction (Kindergarten).
Story telling about famous composers such as Mozart, Tchaikovsky, and Beethoven.  Music is related to this choice with tunes such as Twinkle Twinkle Little Star and Ode to Joy. Within the piano book, folk tunes from diverse cultures are played such as Frere Jacques and the Mexican Hat Dance.  Each holiday (Halloween, St. Patrick’s Day, Cinco De Mayo) has a song to play with a story to tell connected to the music. 3.0 Historical and Cultural Context
Role of Music
3.1 Identify the uses of music in various cultures and time periods (Grade 4).
Diversity of Music
3.2 Play memorized songs from diverse cultures.
Legato, staccato, half arpeggio, and introduction to musical phrasing are again taught by stories and games.  This develops fluent playing and introduces dynamics as students play different songs with 2-finger chords. 4.0 Derive Meaning
4.2 Create developmentally appropriate movements to express pitch, tempo, form and dynamics in music (Grade 2).
As students rehearse for a concert, they learn to play songs in different voices on the keyboard making them sound like an orchestra.  Presentation of music within a group is also taught with correct bowing and entrance to the keyboard. 2.0 Creative Expression

2.3 Play rhythmic ostinatos on classroom instruments. (Grade 2)

Keyboard Curriculum Grade 4 – Grade 8

Overview:

Students participate in a variety of musical activities in each lesson including, writing, musicimprovising, and music playing.  Students learn to play individually, in duet, and group.  Chords to popular music or classic songs are introduced.  Grades 4-8 students are encouraged to perform frequently throughout the year to continue working on performance skills.

Recitals are held for all Arts Alive Schools allowing motivated students to play in public and in the community.  Every child has chance to play in informal recitals for other students and formal recitals at the end of the year.

Curriculum for Keyboard Standards
Introduce simple popular song In C Major, advance students with chord structure.

Moving towards Minor keys such as Cm and Am.

Compose a short musical phrase which applies new skills in notation and play with personal dynamics with chords known.  This can be from popular music known by the student, classic songs such as Haydn’s Surprise Symphony or a popular TV theme.  Purpose to understand repeated phrasing in music on to a page of music. The goal is to have students understand theory through practical play.  Note Value Bingo, Name that Phrase (then play it!)

Artistic Perception

Read and Notate Music
Read, write, and perform simple melodic notation in treble clef in major and minor keys (Grade 5).

1.1 Read, write, and perform intervals and triads.

1.2 Read, write, and perform rhythmic and melodic notation, using standard symbols for pitch, meter, rhythm, dynamics, and tempo in duple and triple meters (Grade 6).

Implement pieces that advance knowledge and familiarity of structure and patterns.  Blues songs such as Rock House or House of Rising Sun are taught for arpeggio practice.

 

Teacher instructs students at every lesson during warm up to play together assigned parts to a chosen rhythm in pairs.  Improvise in various time signatures with rhythms from keyboard.

Students play scales as a round where one student leaves the scale the next takes over helping to establish listening skills.  Practice counting out loud at same time as each student plays scales.

2.0 Creative Expression(Grade 5)

Compose, Arrange, and Improvise
2.3 Compose, improvise, and perform basic rhythmic, melodic, and chordal patterns independently on classroom instruments

(Grade 7).

2.2 Play music written in two and three parts.

2.7 Improvise melodic and rhythmic embellishments and variations on given pentatonic melodies.

 

Curriculum for Keyboard Standards
Discuss music from different cultures and choose a song from either a different period or culture.

Reggae is introduced, as is waltz tempo from classics or musical theatre tunes.  Tell a story about diverse composers.  Students learn one song from a diverse culture per year.

3.0 Historical and Cultural Context

3.3 Play music from diverse cultures and time periods (Grade 8).

3.4 Compare and contrast the distinguishing characteristics of musical genres and styles from a variety of cultures.

Work with individual students to choose introductory classical pieces.  Students are asked to evaluate their playing by choosing a song that applies new skills and challenges or blues music is introduced so they can establish mood and style within their playing. 4.0  Aesthetic Valuing Derive Meaning

4.2 Develop and apply appropriate criteria to support personal preferences for specific musical works (Grade 5).

4.2 Explain how various aesthetic qualities convey images, feeling, or emotion (Grade 6).

Prepare music and performance skills for recitals and school performances. Continue introducing skills of accidentals, notes, and lower octaves on the bass clef as well as higher octaves on the treble clef. 5.0 Connections, Relationships, Applications

Connections and Applications
5.1 Explain the role of music in community events.

 

Suggested Music:

Happy – Pharrell

One Love – Bob Marley

Minuet – J.S Bach

Surprise Symphony – Haydn

Baby What I Say – Ray Charles

Rock House – Ray Charles

Heartbreak Hotel – Elvis Presley

Colors of the Wind – Disney version Key C

Seasons of Love – Larson Key of F

New World Symphony

Lean on Me

Blueberry Hill (left hand practice)

Squiggle Blues (left hand practice)

 

Ukulele Curriculum Kindergarten – Grade 4

Overview:

This new curriculum was devised for younger students to learn the joy of playing this smaller instrument. Students as young as 5 can enjoy playing and singing with confidence. They can advance when bigger on to the guitar or stay with ukulele.  Teachers use songs from different song books such as ‘Ultimate Ukulele”.

Learning to play the ukulele while developing musicality, tempo and dynamics of strumming.

Teaching students to correct mistakes is a constant so progress is always made from class to class.

Curriculum for Ukulele Standards
Correct standing and sitting posture for ukulele, fingering positions, strumming.

 

Demonstrate the “hug” of the instrument.

Straps should be encouraged for performance but not mandatory. Start by singing all songs so students naturally build the melody.

 

Compose, Arrange, and Improvise

2.4 Improvise simple rhythmic and melodic accompaniments, using voice and a variety of classroom instruments. (Grade 2)

 

Demonstrate rhythms on the ukulele, use of thumb and correct “C” hand hold.  Students also learn to internalize the words of song or sing silently. Simplified chords are used for beginners – one finger.

 

Students clapping rhythm before they play, counting out loud then read flash cards so all types of learner are covered, visual, kinesthetic etc. Split the group in two and have one group sing notes back while other students play tunes.

 

String names are taught through the rhyme:

Goats Can Eat Anything”.

 

Mirror image game is used to show students how to play correctly so they can see their partner’s hold and strumming.

 

Learning to play on first two strings, strumming and fingerings to build technique and movement across the ukulele.

1.0 Artistic Perception

Read and Notate Music
1.1 Read, write, and perform simple rhythmic patterns, using eighth notes, quarter notes, half notes, and rests. (Grade 2)

1.2 Read, write, and perform simple patterns of pitch, using solfege (guitar).  (Grade 2)

 

 

Students recite weekly string notes and play games where each student takes turn as you shout out the name of strings. “My Dog Had Fleas” (D & F)

Playing exercises together is encouraged to develop all students’ ability to play tempo together. Rhythm game is taught for tempo practice and putting together improvised songs.

 

Aurally have students play chord/note transitions both ways – i.e. A to E or E to A to learn pitch.

 

Song sheets are given with each new song with chords upon them and strumming patterns

Compose, Arrange, and Improvise

2.4 Improvise simple rhythmic and melodic accompaniments, using voice and a variety of classroom instruments. (Grade 2)

Listen to, Analyze, and Describe Music
1.3 Identify melody, rhythm, harmony, and timbre in selected pieces of music when presented aurally. (Grade 3)

 

Songs should be chosen from the list below. Students memorize songs for performance from different periods of music and American folk music plus from other cultures. The teacher will sing with students until they know the song and then allow them to sing and play independently.

Conducting game for different tempos from different parts of the world.

Role of Music
3.1 Identify the uses of music in various cultures and time periods. (Grade 3)3.3 Play memorized songs from diverse cultures. (Grade 3)
Once students have two or three chords have them play suggested parts in tempo to a drum machine to learn how to improvise or “write tunes” of their own. Compose, Arrange, and Improvise

2.4 Improvise simple rhythmic accompaniments, using body percussion or classroom instruments. (Grade 1)

Students throughout the year play songs in different holidays as such as Christmas or Hanukkah celebrations.

 

Mood and ideas are discussed and their emotions in relation to music. When a song calls for swaying or movement (Blue Suede Shoes) student develop movements to communicate the song style to their audience.

4.2 Create developmentally appropriate movements to express pitch, tempo, form, and dynamics. (Grade 3)

4.3 Describe how specific musical elements communicate particular ideas or moods in music. (Grade 3)

As students rehearse for a concert the patterns in other art forms are pointed out to be similar to music – any discipline that is repeated like music. Connections and Applications
5.1 Identify the use of similar elements in music and other art forms (e.g., form, pattern, rhythm). (Grade 4)

Suggested Music:

Lyric sheets as taught (one verse one chorus)

Two-Chord “Starter” Song Three-Chord Songs
·         Alouette

·         Blow the Man Down

·         Buffalo Gals

·         Down by the Riverside

·         Little Dreidl

·         Hail, Hail the Gang’s all Here

·         How Much is that Doggie in the Window

·         It Ain’t Gonna Rain No More

·         Jambalaya

·         La Cucaracha

·         Runaround Sue

·         Skip to my Lou

·         London bridge

 

·         Ain’t No Bugs on Me

·         Ain’t Too Proud to Beg

·         Barbara Ann

·         My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean

·         Happy Birthday

·         Hokey Pokey

·         He’s Got the Whole World in his Hands

·         Old MacDonald

·         Over the Rainbow

·         This Land is Your Land

·         On Top of Spaghetti

·         She’ll be Coming ‘Round the Mountain

·         Small World

·

Songs to Use with Younger Students
2017
Dixie

Do Re Mi

Home on the Range

Shoo Fly Don’t Bother Me

You are My Sunshine

Oh Susanna!

Oh My Darling Clementine

Daisy Daisy

My Bonnie Lies Over the Ocean
(3/4 time)

Shenandoah

On Top of Spaghetti

Scarborough Fair

London Bridge

Happy – Pharrel

Ukulele Train

Molly Malone

Ukulele Songs (Dr. Uke website has all music)

I Want to be like you Jungle Book

Breakdown Jack Johnson

Rudolph red Nose Reindeer C or F

Oh Susanna

The Lion Sleeps Tonight

Fix You

You Are My Sunshine

Ho Hey

Jailhouse Rock

Rock Around the Clock


Woodwind Instruments Curriculum 
(Flute, Clarinet & Saxophone)

Elementary Grade Levels

Overview:
Each class with be divided into three basic areas of study: instrument technique, music theory, and repertoire. Also, each class we will have brief review of previous classes. The student is expected to practice the lessons on their own time as homework. The students study from the Essential Elements book.

Class One:  Introduction to the instrument: Learning the instrument basics

  • Know the names of the parts to the instrument
  • How to assemble and disassemble our instruments
  • Taking care of the instrument
  • The embouchure or position of the mouth on the instrument. The embouchure will be explained and demonstrated so that the student may try it
  • The proper way to hold the instrument and proper posture.
  • The fingerings for the first notes, and how to play them using proper air support and articulation
  • Call and response exercises on first notes
  • Introduction to the staff–how to read our first notes and rests on the staff, treble clef, time signature, sharp, flat and natural signs
  • CA VAPA Music Content Standards: 1.1, 1.3, 2.3

Class Two:  Sound Production

Breath support and how it affects sound production. Exercises to help students become aware of how they are breathing, how to increase breath capacity and use their air properly.

How embouchure affects sound production and review proper embouchure.

Learn new notes: fingerings, how to read them on the staff and how to play them using proper air support and articulation

Introduce first song

Review and learn new notes and music symbols

CA VAPA Music Content Standards: 1.1, 1.3

Class Three: Rhythm

Review previous and learn new time signatures, note and rest values

How to clap written rhythms and then play that rhythm on the instrument

Perform our first song for each other and discuss what was easy / difficult etc.

Review embouchure, air support and articulation

New Songs: explain any new notes, rhythms or notation

Techniques to practice and learn new material in at home practice time

CA VAPA Music Content Standards: 1.1, 1.3, 1.4, 4.1, 5.4

Class Four: Extending the Range

Review sharps, flats and naturals, introduce Key signature

Playing a major scale and octaves

New Songs: explain any new notes, rhythms or notation

Play for and listen to each other

CA VAPA Music Content Standards: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 4.1, 5.4

Class Five: Harmony

Tuning–Listening to the tuning note and each other, learning how to adjust instruments for tuning notes (moving headjoint or mouthpiece) and while playing (adjusting embouchure, airstream, etc.)

What is a chord? Listening to how two or more notes sound together

Play duets to listen for harmony, melody and accompaniment and keeping a steady tempo

Chose a performance piece to start practicing

New songs and major scale

CA VAPA Music Content Standards: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 2.2, 4.1,

Class Six: Performance

Play our chosen performance piece for each other

Learn about conducting and get a chance to conduct each other

Intervals–whole steps and half steps

Introduce chromatic scale

New songs and major scales

CA VAPA Music Content Standards: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 4.1, 5.4

Class Seven: Articulation and Dynamics

Review correct articulation technique and discuss difference between tongued and slurred notes

Explore dynamics from pp to ff and do loud and soft exercises

Check articulations and dynamics in our performance pieces.

Play for and listen to each other

New songs and major scales

CA VAPA Music Content Standards: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 4.1, 5.1, 5.4

Class Eight: Review and Dress Rehearsal

Review and small quiz on previous material: sound production, staff, note values, key and time signatures, scales.

Play duets and songs

Listen and constructively review the performances

Rehearse and discuss the factors of a good performance

CA VAPA Music Content Standards: 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 4.1, 4.2, 5.1, 5.4

California Sate Board of Education Visual and Performing Arts: Music Content Standards Covered in 8 week curriculum:

  • ARTISTIC PERCEPTION

Read and Notate Music

Read, write, and perform melodic notation for simple songs in major keys

1.2 Read, write, and perform diatonic scales.

Read, write, and perform rhythmic notation

Listen to, Analyze, and Describe Music

1.4 Describe music according to its elements, using the terminology of music.

  • CREATIVE EXPRESSION

Apply Instrumental Skills

2.2 Use classroom instruments to play melodies and accompaniments

Compose, Arrange, and Improvise

2.3 Compose and improvise simple rhythmic and melodic patterns on classroom instruments.

        4.0 AESTHETIC VALUING

Analyze and Critically Assess

4.1 Use specific criteria when judging the relative quality of musical performances.

Derive Meaning

4.2 Describe the characteristics that make a performance a work of art.

        5.0 CONNECTIONS, RELATIONSHIPS, APPLICATIONS

Connections and Applications

5.1 Identify and interpret expressive characteristics in works of art and music.

Careers and Career-Related Skills

5.4 Evaluate improvement in personal musical performances after practice or rehearsal.

Beginning Strings Curriculum Transitional Kindergarten – Grade 3

Overview:

The students learn strings to the Suzuki method with some variation.  Notational accuracy is expected and correct bow hold is paramount in this endeavor. Students must learn to pitch the notes and this sometimes is done through singing each tune they play.  Technical accuracy is developed through the bow hold and the ability to create tone, color, articulation through playing, Communication is taught and students interprets the music, engages the audience and conveys a sense of the meaning of the music they are playing. Strings are able to be taught in multi – level abilities as students can play simple notes and more advanced harmonies written by the teachers. Three performances a year are developed to give students a chance to learn these skills. Classes are ongoing.

Three levels are offered:  Beginners usually Grade 1-3 (some schools offer strings to TK and Kindergarten separately), Grade 4 within music class for 6 weeks and Ensemble Grades 5-8.  Students who are older beginners will advance more quickly but they will start with the same curriculum as below.

 

Curriculum for Strings Grades 1-3 Standards
Learn one octave scales: A and D Major scales C Students play along to CD tracks in class at home for practice – folk tunes, classical and world music are memorized by students.

The students are taught to sing solfege, names of note starting with Open A with hand in air and then each finger is named in scale degree.

1.0  Artistic Perception

Grade 2 & Grade 3- Listen to, Analyze, and Describe Music

1.3 Identify ascending/descending melody and even/uneven rhythm patterns in selected pieces of music.

Learn basics of quality sound production through a new note each week.  Songs such as “Baa Baa Black Sheep” and “Twinkle Variations” are played as ostinatos with different abilities of players to strengthen right hand coordination and rhythm

Pepperoni Basic rhyme for 1/8 and ¼ notes

Triplets are taught in the banana rhyme.

1.0  Artistic Perception & 2.0 Creative Expression

Grade 2 & Grade 3-

1.5 Identify visually and aurally individual wind, string, brass, and percussion instruments used in a variety of music.

2.3 Play rhythmic and melodic ostinatos on classroom instruments.

Learn basics of left hand efficiency and stay in tune. Use of bowing games and rhymes to teach the correct holding of the bow.

Up Like a rocket, Grand Duke of York marching in circle for beat and actions with bow

Creative Expression

2.0  Grade 2- Apply Vocal and Instrumental Skills
2.1 Play with accuracy in a developmentally appropriate range for pitching.

As music is taught moods in minor and major keys.  Students are asked for preferences in different tunes they play. The value of practice is encouraged with all levels of students who have a CD backing track given by the teachers to rehearse at home. Chim Cheree responds with sad minor or happy major. 4.0  Creative Expression

4.3 Describe how specific musical elements communicate particular ideas or moods in music.

Performances are given in three formats:

Informal for their peers, a lunchtime performance for the whole schools and a final concert win formal dress with other instruments (percussion, piano).

Students analyze with their teacher how the different music had diverse response from the audiences. Holiday music such as Jingle Bells and or in movies it creates a mood.

Diversity of  Music Grade 3

3.3 Play memorized songs from diverse cultures.

3.4 Identify differences and commonalities in music from various cultures.

Introduction to Violin Curriculum Grade 4

Overview:

Every student in grade 4 class learns strings to the Suzuki method with some variations. This is a six special program designed for in-school residency.  This violin course is a graded music course in alignment with the school music program offered as a 6 week introductory course.  All students play together and are encouraged to play from a wide repertoire of music aligned to California Music standards for Grade 4.  By Grade 5 students can join the ensemble with their choice of instruments from strings, woodwinds or percussion.

 


Curriculum for Strings Grade 4
Standards
Introduction to bowing styles Refine and perfect posture, bow hold and left hand position for playing the violin and viola. Listen to music from stringed instruments so that students can learn tone color and understand dynamics.  Demonstration of bowing by teacher of staccato and legato Students Plucking the strings pizzicato – copycat style is played with teacher. 1.0 Artistic Perception

Listen to, Analyze, and Describe Music

1.5 Classify how a variety of instruments from diverse cultures produce sound. (Grade 4)

String names are taught  through songs aurally and reading through alpha/numerical – the zipper song is taught as forwards and backwards
1.0 Listen to, Analyze, and Describe Music
1.4 Describe music according to its elements, using the terminology of music. (Grade 4)

 

Learn one major one octave major scales up to A. 1.0 Artistic Perception

Read and Notate Music 1.2 Read, write, and perform diatonic scales.  (Grade 4)

Learn simple songs in simple keys –Hot Cross Buns, Boil Cabbage.

 

1.0 Artistic Perception

Read and Notate Music 1.1 Read, write, and perform melodic notation for simple songs in major keys, using solfege. (Grade 4)

During their 6 week course they listen to the string class and give critiques and suggestions on what they heard. Group evaluation is important for group playing and listening. Improvise is introduced small amounts of notes with beat track with 4 notes the students wish to play.

At the last lesson students share their improvements and what they have learnt.

Three types of performances are given:

Informal for their peers, lunchtime concerts for the whole school and a final formal dress recital. The students constructively share their thoughts on each performance with their teacher.

4.0   AESTHETIC VALUING

Analyze and Critically Assess
4.1 Use specific criteria when judging the relative quality of musical performances.  (Grade 4)

 

5.0 CONNECTIONS, RELATIONSHIPS, APPLICATIONS

Careers and Career-Related Skills
5.4 Evaluate improvement in personal musical performances after practice or rehearsal. (Grade 4)

 

Strings Ensemble Curriculum Grade 5 – Grade 8

Overview:

The students learn strings (violin, viola, cello) to the Suzuki method with some variations. By this grade we have higher expectations using parts and harmonies with more concert work and playing with other instruments towards performances (i.e. percussion and woodwinds).  High school playing is encouraged at this level so that each player strives to work at an advanced level.

Curriculum for Strings Grades 5-8 Standards
Further refine rhythmic skills by playing songs with syncopated rhythms, songs in mixed meters and songs in compound meters.

 

1.0  Artistic Perception

Read and Notate Music

1.2 Read, write, and perform rhythmic and melodic notation in duple, triple, and mixed meters. (Grade 7)

Refine and perfect note reading skills, especially on the G and E strings (violin) or C and G strings (viola). Students will also refine sight-reading skills. 1.0 Artistic Perception

Read and Notate Music

1.3 Read, write, and perform rhythmic notation, including quarter-note triplets and tied syncopation. (Grade 5)

Begin to play two-octave arpeggios up to three sharps. Some students learn violin 1 and violin 2 parts. Teachers arrange popular music such as Star Wars 2.0  Creative Expression

Compose, Arrange, and Improvise

2.5 Arrange simple pieces for instruments, using traditional sources of sound. (Grade 6)

Start to play ensemble music that is in multiple melodic and rhythmic parts. The teacher will have those who have played before play Part 2 with harmony while beginners take the simple part 1.

Frere Jacques is played as a round.

1.0 Artistic Perception

Listen to, Analyze, and Describe Music

1.4 Analyze the use of music elements in aural examples from various genres and cultures.

Refine legato and staccato strokes. 1.0 Artistic Perception

Listen to, Analyze, and Describe Music

1.4 Describe music according to its elements, using the terminology of music. (Grade 4)

Memorize songs of 24 measures or more often Canon in D, Ode to Joy, Variations on classic repertoire.

 

Artistic Perception

Listen to, Analyze, and Describe Music

1.6 Describe larger music forms (sonata-allegro form, concerto, theme and variations). (Grade 6)

 Through our teachers who are professional musicians on TV and stage – the students learn the value of how musicians play in an orchestra or record popular music in different cultural styles. Talk about current movie and how music is portrayed.
3.0  Historical and Cultural Context Understanding the Historical Contributions and Cultural Dimensions of Music

3.1 Compare music from two or more cultures of the world as to the functions the music serves and the roles of musicians.

Introduce student’s different techniques such as plucking. More memorization is expected and expression of dynamics.

Double stops for songs – one string at a time for accuracy, play only E string and then fingers on A for dexterity.  (Grade 6)

 

Creative Expression

Apply Vocal and Instrumental Skills

2.1 Play  a repertoire of music literature representing various genres, styles, and cultures with expression, technical accuracy, good posture, tone quality, in ensembles (level of difficulty: 1 on a scale of 1-6)

Give 4 notes backing track or drum track – play any rhythm so they learn to play in time. 2.0 Creative Expression

Grade 6- Compose, Arrange, and Improvise

2.6 Improvise simple melodies.

Sight read parts of songs such as: William Tell Overture, Irish Fiddle Songs, and Yankee Doodle.  Older students apply criteria appropriate for different styles of music to evaluate the quality and effectiveness of their performances.

Those who are competent on their instruments will solo or work in small ensemble work to improve their improvisational work.

4.0 AESTHETIC VALUING
Derive Meaning
4.3 Compare and contrast the differences between one performance of a specific musical work and another performance of the same work. (Grade 7)

Analyze and Critically Assess
4.1 Develop criteria for evaluating the quality and effectiveness of musical performances and compositions, including arrangements and improvisations, and apply the criteria in personal listening and performing. (Grade 6)

Suggested Music:

Atacama Crossing

Easter Island Monkey

Suzuki p. 12

Suzuki p. 13

Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star

Pepperoni Pizza

Au Claire de la Lune

Hot Cross Buns

Rocking ‘Round the Strings

Jingle Bells

Jingle Bell Rock

Dreidl

Good King Wenceslas

Mozart Medley (Twinkle Variations)

Ode To Joy

It’s a Small World

Somewhere Over the Rainbow

Supercalifragilistic

Paddy Whack  (triplets)

Minuet 1 J.S. Bach (key change)

Stars Wars

Suggested Music:

O come little children – gr.1

Mary had a little lamb – gr.1

Edelweiss – gr.1

La Bamba – gr.1

Turkey in the straw – gr.1

Arkansas Traveler – gr. 1

Polly Wolly Doodle – gr.1

Au Claire de la Lune – gr.

Hot Cross Buns – gr. 1

Rocking ‘Round the Strings – gr.

Jingle Bells – gr.2

Jingle Bell Rock – gr2

Dreidl – gr. 1

Good King Wenceslas

Mozart Medley (Twinkle Variations)

Ode To Joy

Somewhere Over the Rainbow

Supercalifragilistic

Paddy Whack (triplets)

Minuet 1 J.S. Bach (key change)

Stars Wars

Frere Jacques

Grand Old Duke of York